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Free workshop on video live streaming

A lot of what I post are videos from my video livestreams. Well, Common Cause and the St Andrews Social Justice Crew are sponsoring a free video livestream workshop this coming Saturday. Space is limited so RSVP is required. Here's the wording on the flyer:

Citizen Advocate Workshop: Livestreaming

Hold power accountable – using your smartphone.

Live media coverage of important current events is shrinking. It’s increasingly becoming citizens’ responsibility to share significant events and key policy-decisions with others.

H. Doug MatsuokaAt this free workshop, you’ll learn from social justice activist H. Doug Matsuoka how to broadcast video live to the internet using your smartphone (iPhone, Android, WinPho).

H. Doug Matsuoka of Hawaii Guerrilla Video Hui has livestreamed midnight police raids on the homeless, protests and demonstrations, legislative hearings, and "hallway interviews" at political and legislative events. He has often provided the only video broadcast and record of testimony at hearings affecting the public.

Date: Saturday, August 23, 2014, 
Time: 10:00 -- 11:30am
Where: St. Andrews Cathedral Offices, 2nd Floor Conference Room
Parking: St. Andrews parking lot
Bring: You are encouraged (but not required) to bring your smartphone (iPhone, Android, WinPho) and laptop
Cost: Free

Speaker: H. Doug Matsuoka of Hawaii Guerrilla Video Hui (@hdoug on Twitter)
Event sponsor: Common Cause Hawaii

Space is limited, and participation is open to the first dozen RSVPs!

Questions? Email hawaii@commoncause.org


Doug

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