Skip to main content

Please sign a petition to get the City of Honolulu to stop midnight raids on the houseless and deOccupy Honolulu rights defenders

[I'm circulating a petition to get the City & County of Honolulu to stop its midnight raids on deOccupy Honolulu and the homeless. I'm posting the letter here (with links to some info and background) to make it easier to circulate. I'm hoping those so moved can forward to friends for signature. One of my friends admonished me that the petition "is about 120 years late" referring to the armed overthrow of the Hawaiian Nation on January 17, 1893. Point well taken. But maybe better late than never..? Mahalo, Doug.]

One of my favorite photos showing a homeless tent across from the former residence of Anna Rice Cooke, of the Big Five family of Castle & Cooke, sugar/land barons who profited from the theft of Hawaiian land and the armed overthrow of Hawaii. A full Flickr photo set here.

Information update: 10/23/2013

Aloha supporters,

And mahalo for your support in demanding the City of Honolulu to stop the midnight raids on the houseless and deOccupy Honolulu. Here are some links with background information and a link to the petition you can forward.

I just want to send some links with information and some background, as well as ask you to send the petition out to any friends or organization who might understand what it's like to be houseless, a member of a vulnerable minority, or might be an advocate of civil rights.

Blade Walsh and Cathy Russell are currently in trial for their participation in a protest against Bill 54, an ordinance used to seize property from the homeless. I wrote about the original protest and arrest here at my blog, The DougNote:

Madori Rumpungworn is currently serving a 30 day sentence at OCCC for her protest against City authorities who had repeatedly raided the homeless and seized their property including clothing and food:

There is no end to the City's escalation. Bill 59 proposes to make it illegal to "lie down on the sidewalk." This is the direct criminalization of homelessness. I mounted my testimony opposing Bill 59 at my blog.

Here is a link to the petition. Please forward it to any friends and organizations that might understand what it's like to be houseless or a member of a vulnerable minority, or who is an advocate of civil rights.

Thank you for your support

H. Doug Matsuoka
For the supporters of Honolulu's houseless and deOccupy Honolulu human rights defenders

Comments

  1. This is hilarious. It seems like the C&C is only targeting your group at Thomas Square. Apparently Occupy Kakaako gets a heads up on when the C&C will come by so in the days leading up to the raid, they start piling trash up on the curbs. The morning of the raid, you can see them all packing up their stuff and moving into the parks or grassy areas. Few hours after the raid, they are back in their spots like nothing happened.

    When will your group do something to prevent homelessness? Seems like all you guys want to do is "stick it to the man" and "FTP".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hilarious? I think you don't really find the situation hilarious, but you want to belittle deOccupy Honolulu activists and the homeless. Many of the homeless encampments share survival techniques and information, and that's what you might have witnessed. Or heard from someone.

      You ask, "When will your group do something to prevent homelessness?" Well, it's not something the group can do by itself. What I'm trying to do is bring into public awareness what is really happening because I don't think the public knows the homeless are being raided in the middle of the night, or that their possessions are being trashed, or that there are even people trying to speak up for them.

      I think people resist knowing what's going on with the homeless because they don't feel like they can do much about it. The public should feel as though they are the driver of society and community, but I get the feeling that after the recent financial crash they feel vulnerable and powerless, at the financial and political mercy of large corporate giants, and spied upon by the civil authority. The only "official" action we are given is selecting candidate A or B from the same corporate vending machine.

      Now that would be hilarious if it were not true.

      Delete
  2. Doug,

    Are you and your group doing anything for the marriage bill? I think the fight against the C&C could be put on hold since this seems more important.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think the bill legalizing gay marriage is very important and many of the people associated with deOccupy Honolulu and the Occupy Movement are participating in that. I write things to bring them to public attention so people know what's going on. I never advocate (well, never HAVE advocated) putting anything on hold for something else. The City has not stopped its raids. There was one this morning, so I will not stop demanding that they stop.

      I also advocate for the passage of the marriage equality bill. One deOccupier wrote: "All of the debates...and I do mean all of them...about marriage make me sick. Why? Because Gay People aren't going to be able to get married untill straight people let them. Fuck that."

      Uptwinks, as we would say. Or to translate, "I agree."

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

HCDA creates their own anti-homeless police at HAR hearing

While no one was watching, the HCDA (Hawaiʻi Community Development Authority) held  a Hawaii Administrative Rules hearing that creates their own anti-homeless police force, and (incidentally) raises park fees by up to 500%. The affected parks are at the intersection of Honolulu Council Districts 4, 5, and 6, (Trevor Ozawa, Ann Kobayashi, and Carol Fukunaga respectively) but none (or their staff) were present today. These laws were made without any oversight from the public or their elected representatives.

Who knew that such sweeping changes could be made without the oversight of any elected officials? And after one decision making hearing that is accountable to no one? If the Honolulu City Council had to rule on such changes, it would require three full council hearings, and opportunities for public participation at each.

My own interest in attending the hearing was to get some kind of hint as to the mechanism the City would use to curtail First Amendment rights in Thomas Square afte…

What The City Doesn’t Want You To Know About Thomas Square

[This article was originally published by CivilBeat on July 21, 2016. I'm reprinting it with video clips. Doug]

The City of Honolulu plans to close Thomas Square on Aug. 15 for six months and re-open it in February 2017 as something completely different, according to its master plan. Although city officials have unveiled grandiose plans concerning a drastic makeover, there are a number of troubling things they are trying to keep under cover:

1. It will no longer be a public park. The master plan calls for Thomas Square to be transferred from the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation, where it is a public park, to its Department of Enterprise Services. What is it? The department runs the Blaisdell Center, the Waikiki Shell, the zoo and the public golf courses. By way of a memo dated April 28 from the city’s enterprise chief Guy Kaulukukui to the state’s head of the Department of Land and Natural Resources, the city asked the state to make changes to allow a change of purpose for…

Eric Seitz: Pro bono is a crock

At yesterday's "Justice in Jeopardy, Expanding Access to Justice in Challenging Economic Times" at the UH Richardson Law School, Dean of Harvard Law School Martha L. Minow pointed out that one in five Americans now qualify for civil legal assistance because they are within 125% of the Poverty Level -- a record high in the history in the county. As the demand for legal services grows, the available resources continue to diminish, leaving most without the "equal protection" of the law.

I checked out the breakout session on pro bono because I used to work for Hawaii's pro bono referral service, Volunteer Legal Services Hawaii (VLSH).

These days, most pro bono services are not attorneys representing clients, but short informational sessions at legal clinics. Moderator Robert LeClair asked attorney Eric Seitz what he thought of this turn in pro bono services.  This is what Eric said:

"Well, let me start out by saying that I've always thought pro bono w…