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Raid #10 on Occupy Honolulu -- Bill 54 "tagging raid"

For immediate release:

Honolulu Police and City crews under Wes Chun (Honolulu Facilities Maintenance Department) conducted a Bill 54 "tagging raid" on (De)Occupy Honolulu at their encampment on the corner of Ward and Beretania this morning at 7am sharp. The City used 10 personnel in 5 cars including 1 "Aloha Police" in an aloha shirt, and 2 armed policemen.

The group has suffered 9 previous raids including the one on December 29, 2011, in which City crews redrew park boundaries to tear down and destroy the main encampment. Since then, (De)Occupy Honolulu has been setting up a public forum on the corner in what the City claims is park area, and moving that to the sidewalk during park closed hours. Those staying at the encampment set up tents along the roadside under the protection of the Kanawai Mamalahoe, the Law of the Splintered Paddle, which is enshrined in the State Constitution. The Honolulu Police Department (whose uniforms and badges bear a depiction of the Splintered Paddle) repeatedly violates this Law.

(De)Occupy Honolulu resident and Makiki Neighborhood Board member Chris Smith's recorded live stream of the raid is here at his Pineapple Glitch channel on Ustream.

The police actions are commonly called "Bill 54" raids after the bill which became ordinance 11-029 Revised Ordinances of Honolulu which allows the City to seize attended property that has been stored on public property for 24 continuous hours. The tagged items are subject to seizure after 24 hours, but in practice, the City has taken untagged items that are in compliance with the ordinance.

In this one minute excerpt from the live stream, Lucas Miller asks if the law only protects those with property:



Outstanding issues: 
      (1) (De)Occupy Honolulu has not been able to recover certain items even with receipts and photographs of the items 
      (2) HPD and City crews have seized personal possessions from private property (as described in this post with video of the 2/15/2012 raid); and
      (3) HPD and City crews have seized property that was not stored on public property as the ordinance requires (as described in this post with video of the 2/29/2012 raid).
      (4) The consequences of this sort of selective enforcement and violation of laws by HPD and City personnel are even greater for the homeless population who do not have political organization or video recording and live streaming capability. 

My live stream of the aftermath (about 30 minutes after the raid) with interviews is here at my HonoluluDoug Ustream channel.

This is (De)Occupy Honolulu's 128th continuous day of encampment, making it one of the most enduring camp of the Occupy Movement worldwide.

H. Doug Matsuoka
12 March 2012
Makiki, Honolulu

[Update: 3/14/2012: At least 10 armed police and a crew of City workers raided the camp on 3/14/2012 at 3am. Click here for my video and post on that raid.]



Comments

  1. THE POLICE ALSO STOLE MY BICYCLE THAT I RESTORED FROM THE TRASH BIN AFTER BEATING & KICKING ME AT MAGIC ISLAND FOR JAPANESE LANTERN FLOATING HEY BEAT A HAWAIIAN GRANDFATHER WHOSE GRANDCHILDREN GOT RUNOVER BY CAR CAUSE OVERCROWDING US HAWAIIANS WHILE THESE ILLEGAL OCCUPIERS STEAL HUGE LANDS FOR RANCHES KANEOHE RANCH IS HAWAIIANS LANDS BEFOR THE OVERTHROW SO NOW IT MUST BE RETURNED BACK TO US THE HAWAIIANS. STEALING IS STEALING NO MATTER WHAT CLOTHES U USE KARMA ONLY SEE TRUTH & CRIMES AGAINST GOD.PELE KU KANE PULE ME KE ALOHA

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  2. thanks for sharing.

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