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My Guerrilla Video Activists presentation notes

[Update: This post originally served as the class notes for my part of the Guerrilla Video Activists Workshop on 02/11/2012. I've updated the post to include recordings of the actual workshop live stream, as well as confirmation of its value: the video of the police raid and seizure of personal possessions on private property of 02/15/2012.]

I'm scheduled to help present a Guerilla Video Activists presentation at 3pm on Saturday, February 11. My section is on live streaming, so I figure I'll try to live stream it. [Duh!] Since I'll be using a bunch of examples, I'll clip them here so we can follow along.

Also, if you're sitting there at 3pm to 6pm on Sunday, you might be able to see the live stream here. Actually, this embedded viewer should be able to view anything that's currently broadcasting live.

[Embedded viewer to HonoluluDoug at Ustream with really irritating ads]


I'm probably still working on this and will be updating but thought I'd mount what I have while I work on things to keep the page bookmarkable.

DOUG'S LIVESTREAMING PRESENTATION NOTES

“Your enemy can teach you more than your sensei [master]. Be grateful to your enemy for helping to develop your technique and perfect your character.”

I'm doing this Occupy Style, so this isn’t “teaching,” this is sharing, mutual learning, mutual aid.

Before I start, this is way cool:
LIVESTREAMING RESOURCES:

Choose between live streaming and recording video:

Immediacy (and documentation that can't be seized easily) vs poorer quality, no editing. But live streaming takes a minute or two (or sometimes longer) to start broadcasting.

Considerations: Are there other people recording/livestreaming? How to handle multiple coverage?

Time feature on Occupy Wall Street’s Tim Pool:

Tim Pool’s Ustream channel: http://www.ustream.tv/theother99

H. Doug Matsuoka’s current Ustream channel: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/honoluludoug

Doug’s older channel (with the raid of 12/30/11): http://www.ustream.tv/channel/hdoug808-s-first-show

Ustream main page where you can sign up for free (or pay) page: http://www.ustream.tv/ 

Livestream.com is also well known (but less mobile friendly): http://new.livestream.com/

The characteristic of livestreaming is one LOOOOONG take. Use the periods of nothingness to bring viewers up to date. If you are walking down the road, tell the people why you are walking down the road and where you are going. BUT know when to shut up too – that’s what I have to learn.

Dos and Don’ts from the first minute of police interaction video:


Long takes, the whole unedited action, form valuable documentation. But can be kinda boring. Solution: Livestreams (which record to the streaming site) can be downloaded and edited.

AFTER THE LIVESTREAM

Livestream recordings can be downloaded and edited. I usually transfer to Youtube to avoid the really intrusive and irritating ads on Ustream.
My Youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TheYTDoug

Livestreams and Youtube videos generally .flv files (Flash Viewer files) but can be converted to .mp4 or H264 for editing. I use iMovie on Mac and also on iPhone/iPad.

From the livestream of end of the first day of trial for the Occupy Honolulu 6:

From the livestream in the witness room of the trial of the Occupy Honolulu 6:

EQUIPMENT:
Gotta talk about what you need but also have to remember that the idea is to try to do the maximum with the minimum. Maximum impact for minimum expenditure ‘cuz if we had the money we wouldn’t be in this workshop.

Smartphone: iPhone (or even iPad or even iPod touch w/mifi), Android device, WinPho.

Dedicated streaming devices like Looxcie..?

Data plan:  Bandwidth. You can stream via cell data (iPhone AT&T 3G is really crappy but I grandfathered in to unlimited plan). Streaming will eat data. You can sometimes use available wi-fi, but many networks (like the University of Hawaii) block the streaming ports. The device may be expensive, but this is a big expense that has to be budgeted. Else can use a mi-fi device from Sprint/Verizon, etc. These will allow devices such as iPod Touch and wifi-only iPads to stream.

Important: To stream you need power and bandwidth. Streaming takes a lot of electricity so advise getting a battery. I use Mophie PowerStation (new versions are 4,000 mAh) and cost around $80.
       
CURATION

What you can do without even being there: Curation, the next step in guerilla media.

Anyone can “highlight” a section of a video on Ustream.
Any youtube or other video .flv can be "captured" for editing
Videos and photos can be selectively aggregated and distributed -- "curated."
The Creative Commons...

------------------------------------------------
Livestream recordings of our 2/11/2012 workshop:

Note: Irritating Ustream ads at beginning!

From "E Ho Mai" chant to part of Keli‘iwai's presentation:


[Lost some bandwidth or something here so lost end of part of Keli‘iwai and beginning of Kamuela Vance's presentation]

Kamuela Vance, Pono Kealoha, Laulani Teale, H. Doug Matsuoka:


Role Play: Help Help I'm being oppressed!
[help]

Wrap up


[Update: A few days after this workshop, Honolulu Police and City Crews raided Occupy Honolulu and seized personal possessions from people on private property. But there were three video cameras on them including a live stream by someone who had taken the workshop. The 3 point-of-view videos were edited into an 8 minute video which clearly shows the illegality and impropriety of the police action:]







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